Political parties in Haiti

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Isabelle_

Political parties in Haiti

Post by Isabelle_ » Wed Apr 07, 2004 11:45 pm

This article [Perspective and interpretation - From Jamaica Observer, moved to the References forum category] was posted with the intention of provoking discussion on the forum about political parties in Haiti.

This topic should be debated in the Haitian community today as well as on this forum. If elections were held in Haiti in 90 days, many feel that the LAVALAS party would win most of the contests because it is the most organized political party.

Radios in Haiti report the existence of 183 political parties today.

My key questions are as follows:

a) Do we need so many political parties?
b) What could each 183 political party individually stand for?
c) How many party members do they each have?
d) What is the leadership structure of each of these organizations?
e) How often are elections held for President/Secretary General/any other leadership p
osition?
f) Can the by-laws be found on the Internet or in a document for each of them?
g) What plan of action has any of these organization put forth to solve the issues that Haiti and its people face?

jwet pou nou!

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Post by admin » Mon Apr 12, 2004 9:53 am


[quote]Radios in Haiti report the existence of 183 political parties today.[/quote]
I think that you misunderstood. Most likely, they were referring to the political agency baptised "183", which was headed by Andre Apaid Jr. I do not believe that it was registered under Haitian Law as a political party, but I could be wrong. It represented "the new opposition" to the Aristide government as opposed to "the old opposition", that is the various groupings of opposing political parties known as "Espace de Concertation", "Convergence Démocratique", etc. Those were increasingly perceived in Haitian society as old academic farts, which means that they were led by various elite intellectuals who were long on pontificating against the Aristide government but short on political successes (their most notable accomplishments having been the announcement of a virtual "parallel govern
ment" and their longstanding connections to external sources of financing in France/U.S. and most notably U.S. Senator Jesse Helms and the International Republican Institute). Here are just a few key figures of "this old opposition" for illustration purposes (though every member of this forum probably could name as many others from their favorite list of "the gang who could not shoot straight") : Gérard Pierre-Charles, "virtual president" Gérard Gourgue, Serge Gilles, Victor Benoit, Micha Gaillard, Leslie Manigat, Hubert de Ronceray, Evans Paul...

In sharp contrast to their long-playing comedy of errors, arose a new political agency "from the civil society" which recruited younger members, projected itself as less "ronflant" in spite of a new "Social Contract" that only served to temporarily mask its dead-on objective of "getting rid of Aristide", cultivated effective relations with the Bush State Department, the University students, the defunct repressive military and paramilitary forces of FADH and
FRAPH, in short most of the disaffected parties in Haiti's wretched political scene. A wealthy industrialst, with no pretensions to be a professional politician, put it all together and quickly stole the limelight from "the old opposition" which most likely would have continued to "oppose" day and night until the last day of the constitutional government. Andy did not pontificate, he stung like a scorpion. Whereas the government chose to defend itself by relying ever more on Public Relations experts and its close circle of influential friends, the new opposition agency seemed to understand much better the fluidity of national sovereignty and how things truly work in the Bush Era: in the end, they had as their accomplices the power brokers of the U.S., France, and Canada governments, and the services of their respective diplomatic representations in Haiti. Those who could not see the writing on the wall probably never appreciated the new dynamics of the political situation in Haiti.

Who used whom i
n the end? That is the story that is currently developing in Haiti. How many Haitians will actually learn something from it to benefit their country in the future is an altogether different conjecture.


[quote]My key questions are as follows:

a) Do we need so many political parties?
b) What could each [xxx] political party individually stand for?
c) How many party members do they each have?
d) What is the leadership structure of each of these organizations?
e) How often are elections held for President/Secretary General/any other leadership position?
f) Can the by-laws be found on the Internet or in a document for each of them?
g) What plan of action has any of these organization put forth to solve the issues that Haiti and its people face?[/quote]

Well, it took me so long to answer the preceding question, I had better stop right here. Perhaps others will care to impart their wisdom.

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