Kwanzaa celebrations

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Kwanzaa celebrations

Post by admin » Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:18 pm


KWANZAA CELEBRATIONS
DECEMBER 26 THRU JANUARY 1

Sunday, December 26: the Kwanzaa observance for Umoja (Unity)

Monday, December 27: the celebration for Kujichagulia (Self-determination)

Tuesday, December 28: Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)

Wednesday, December 29: Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)

Thursday, December 30: the observance for Nia (Purpose)

Friday, December 31: the celebration for Kuumba (Creativity)

Saturday, January 1: the Kwanzaa observance for Imani (Faith)

Kwanzaa is observed for seven days from December 26 thru January 1. It is centered on the Nguzo Saba or Seven Principles. On each day of Kwanzaa one of the Seven Principles is celebrated.

The Seven Principles are recited in both Swahili, the most widely spoken African language, and English. They are Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-determination), Ujima (Col
lective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith).

Dr. Maulana Karenga is the creator of Kwanzaa. The holiday was founded in the 1960s. It has its origins in the first harvest celebrations of Africa. According to Dr. Karenga the holiday is celebrated by 28 million people worldwide.

T-dodo

Post by T-dodo » Wed Dec 29, 2004 12:30 pm

Guy,

Thank you for putting this piece informing me more about Kwanzaa. I am always amazed when one of my Jewish colleagues assumed that Kwanzaa is one holiday that I celebrate. The question that I have is what the relevance of Kwanzaa to the Haitian culture?

The reason I am asking is that Christmas was our favorite holiday when I was growing up. Since most of us grew up as Catholics or Christian Protestants, it made sense to us the link with Christmas. But, Kwanzaa! I still don't fully understand what Kwanzaa is and means. Should we compare it to an "Indigenisme" movement in the US. If so, why should we have two? How do African Americans see our reaction to Kwanzaa?

I was not aware of Kwanzaa until recently after living for some time in the US. Does anyone have any opimion on this?

Jean-Marie

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Post by admin » Thu Dec 30, 2004 1:45 am

Well, I checked the three links. All of them refer to ONE person's denunciation of Kwanzaa, as anti-Christian and anti-white racist: Reverend Jesse Lee Peterson. This dude has a serious axe to grind!

From what I have understood over the years, Kwanzaa is a celebration of a set of POSITIVE CULTURAL VALUES, with regards to community, family, work ethic, and self-esteem. IT IS NOT A RELIGIOUS HOLIDAY. Whoever said that it should replace Christmas????? Nobody HAS TO celebrate Kwanzaa. No government tells one too. No religion tells one to. No formal authority tells one to. Everyone is FREE to safely ignore it. But why should the idea of celebrating some Afrocentric values bother the hell out of Reverend Jesse Lee Petersen?

Jesse Lee is against affirmative action, he is against reparations, he derides all liberal Black leaders, etc. To be honest, the guy presents himself as an ugly caricature of self-hatred, and from I read so
far I would not give him one iota of credit.

You know, I do not celebrate Kwanzaa either. I have not made the time for it. I likely would gain much from doing it. At least it does not sound as fake as Christmas really is. As far as I can tell, Christmas is the most fake of Christian Holidays along with the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, but it is indeed a nice tradition. It brings a lot of WARMTH to many people's hearts: human beings are like that, it's our nature. Jesus is not being born every December 25, you know, and it is EXTREMELY UNLIKELY that he was born on that date (heck, no one, but no one knows when he was born. Show me his birth certificate! Even the Pope would not have a case for Christmas, on a historical basis) But it is also a day for Christians to go to Mass in their Sunday best, to sing Christmas carols, to buy lots of presents for friends and family members, hereby giving a needed boost to the economy. Don't get me wrong: I have nothing against traditions, but you have
got to admit that Christmas has as much or little to do with the annual and perpetual rebirth of Jesus than December 5 has to do with the "discovery" of Hispaniola.

Celebrate your myths, and nobody will oppose you. But God forbid someone should suggest celebrating some African values... and it becomes a cause of alarm, as racist, anti-white, anti-Christmas, anti-Christian, anti-God, and if we left it to "Reverend" Jesse Lee Peterson, it would become an offense deserving the death penalty!

Who is spreading the HATE here ? ? ?

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