Why don't African-Americans take ownership of Haiti?

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Why don't African-Americans take ownership of Haiti?

Post by admin » Tue Mar 09, 2004 2:05 am

[quote]
CARICOM: Toussaint Louverture's vision of a Free Haiti.
Haiti's Bicentennial Message to Africans in the Americas.

On January 1, 2004, Haiti will celebrate 200 years of Independence, as the first Free Black Republic of the world, following our victorious battles over the evil of slavery and colonialism for the benefit of all oppressed men and women in the Americas. This good news did not reach the great majority of its beneficiaries in the Caribbean Basin and the United States for reasons that you will understand.

We hope that you can help Haiti deliver in the year 2004, what our freedom fighters were not able to accomplish in 1804, because of the lack of communications and access available to us and our fellow maroons in the Americas: a genuine gift of citizenship and a sincere offer to share our
freedom, our land, our flag and our identity with the rest of the family.

The offer and acceptance of the Haitian Identity, to be shared with their current status, would provide the Caribbean community, the African-American community and our Haitian-American children, in particular, the equilibrium, self esteem, sense of ownership and belonging that is currently lacking in a great number of our people's spirit and soul.

Why don't African-Americans take ownership of Haiti?

As you know, our victory in 1804 was also your victory. Our freedom was also earned on your behalf. Our HOME is your HOME! HAITI is also your NATION and your HERITAGE! Haiti, without the embrace of the African-American Community, is nothing but a lost slave ship drifting in the middle of the Atlantic for the past 200 years, with no port to anchor and no country to welcome its old and tired passengers or "spoiled" cargo.

By choosing, for the first time in the history of this nation and their
relationship with the US establishment, the dual-citizenship or identity as Haitian-Americans, the black population of the United States can make history, again, as we approach the 200 years anniversary of Haiti's Independence, and together with their Haitian brothers and sisters complete the work of Toussaint Louverture and make Haiti once again a refuge and a home for all of us, as we redefine ourselves and live up to our true identity.

Furthermore, this action will be a lot more powerful and dignifying than the "reparations movement" as we seek to uplift our people spirit in both nations. This positive and historical "reunification movement," with only our people, the beneficiaries of the Haitian Revolution, making decisions, for themselves and by themselves, would be a lot safer than running the risk of accepting another "check marked insufficient fund" as reported in Dr. Martin Luther King's speech.

Let us write our own check this time, reclaiming our common destiny, in order to earn an
d regain our self respect as a community of free, equal and mature black men and women in the Americas.

If East and West Germany can reunite, so can we!

Who, therefere, among us will have the courage to finish the job of Toussaint Louverture and "bring down this Caribbean Berlin wall" made up of false national identities, imposed languages and borders, learned prejudices and racism, so that we may, "free at last," reunite our broken and dislocated African families in the Americas? Did Haitians liberate all the slaves or did the slaves owners successfully contained the Haitian Revolution? Can Haiti survive this continued isolation 200 years later?Will Africans in the Americas understand their role and duty in this long struggle and take affirmative actions to help us successfully end this unfinished 200 years war for Black Liberation and our people dignity and survival?



Jean F Colin

Cooper City Florida 33330[/quote]

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