Massive Protests Demand Vote Results in Haiti

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Michel Nau_

Massive Protests Demand Vote Results in Haiti

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 9:32 am

Massive protests demand vote results in Haiti

Burning barricades went up in Haiti as supporters of René Préval protested slow counting of returns from last week's election.

BY JOE MOZINGO
jmozingo@MiamiHerald.com

PORT-AU-PRINCE - Haiti's capital was paralyzed by burning barricades and massive protests Monday as supporters of René Préval demanded to know the final results of a presidential election they believed he had won; and the nation once again slid toward anarchy.

Préval, who had been awaiting the results at his family's hometown in northern Haiti, was flown by U.N. helicopter to Port-au-Prince for an emergency meeting with Haitian and foreign officials on efforts to ease the growing tensions as the ballot counting approached day six.

The airport, stores and schools were close
d, and neither Haitian police officers nor U.N. peacekeepers were visible for most of the day as tens of thousands of Préval supporters jammed the streets.

A row of burning cars blocked the airport road at 5:30 p.m. and dozens of barricades made from burning tires, rocks, buses, truck chassis and telephone poles cut off all traffic in the city.
One Préval supporter was confirmed killed in the suburb of Tabarre during a confrontation with U.N. peacekeepers. A U.N. spokesman said the soldiers only fired in the air and the fatal shot must have come from someone else.

Several thousand Préval backers roared past U.N. Blue Helmets into the upscale Hotel Montana, where the electoral council holds its news conferences. They danced and swam in the pool, but later left peacefully.

South African Nobel Laureate and Anglican Bishop Desmond Tutu, in Haiti to promote reconciliation, stood above the c
rowd on a second-floor balcony and urged calm.

''You have to show to the world you have dignity, that you are law abiding,'' he said.

Interim Prime Minister Gérard Latortue, U.S. Chief of Mission Tim Carney and the head of the U.N. peacekeeping mission, Juan Gabriel Valdes, hoped to convince Préval to urge his supporters to calm down and await a final tally.

But Préval nixed the suggestion, saying he was not the one who riled up his supporters and he won't be making any statements until Haitian electoral officials got the numbers right. ''We have questions about the electoral process,'' Préval told reporters Monday, according to the Associated Press. ``We want to see how we can save the process.''Latortue went on the radio later in the afternoon as the mood started to settle somewhat, urging calm and saying, ``I guarantee there is no cheating going on. The will of the people will be shown wit
h the results.''

The U.S. Embassy urged American citizens to stay off the streets. And Brazil, which leads the 9,500-member U.N peacekeeping mission, asked U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to hold a Security Council meeting.

Haiti's first election since President Jean-Bertrand Aristide fled the country during an armed revolt in 2004 began with great hope last Tuesday as voters streamed into the streets before dawn and lined up at polling centers, in some places by the thousands. By Monday, that hope was rapidly evaporating.

The electoral council's last report showed that with almost 90 percent of the polling places tallied, Préval was leading with 48.7 percent of the vote, short of the majority he needs to avoid a runoff. Far back in second was former president Leslie Manigat, with 11.8 percent.

Several knowledgeable officials told The Miami Herald that council director general [b:95d
bf48fa1]Jacques Bernard wanted to declare Préval the victor before the tabulation finished in order to stave off chaos. A credible survey conducted by Haitian observers suggested he would get more than 52 percent, but so far the results have not reflected that. U.S., U.N., and Canadian diplomats were encouraging Bernard to finish the count.

Manigat said he would reject any backroom deal, however. ''Our position is very clear, whoever gets 50 percent plus one wins, and if they don't get it, we go to a second round,'' he told The Miami Herald.

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for the Western Hemisphere Thomas Shannon said Haitians should ``understand that these elections have been free and fair, and that is why the international community now is working with the candidates . . . to let their supporters know that the results as announced . . . are the [true] results.''

José Miguel In
sulza, secretary general of the Organization of American States, told The Miami Herald that presidential candidates have been provided with copies of tally sheets so they can sit down with electoral officials and work out their differences.

Voters in poor parts of Port-au-Prince, where Préval received up to 90 percent support, say they can't understand how he may not have won an outright majority. And, in a nation where elections have been marked by fraud, Haitians are not used to either runoffs or long and methodical vote counts.

The top U.N. electoral advisor here, Salvadoran-born Gerard Le Chevallier, said the delays have been due to technical problems and not fraud.

A portion of the tally sheets from 254 of the 9,208 polling stations was destroyed when political parties ransacked nine provincial voting centers in an attempt to skew the vote, he said. Poll workers from another 504 stations failed to include in their tallies the secret codes that allow cler
ks to enter the results from that polling station into the computer.

Many of the polling stations affected took in the ballots from poor neighborhoods like the slum of Cité Soleil, where Préval has overwhelming support, he said.

On the streets, demonstrators filled many of the main roads and the mood whipsawed between jubilation at Préval's high showing and anger over suspicions of fraud. Unlike in other recent outbursts of street violence, however, there was no major visible presence of guns.

''It's been a very agitated day, but there has been little actual violence,'' said David Wimhurst, a U.N. spokesman.

Some Préval supporters watched the disorder with mixed feelings. ''I think they're just not finished counting yet, but they'll give it to us,'' said Magalie Paul, 18. But a leader of one of the armed gangs in Cité Soleil said he would not be able to avoid worse violence unless a Préval victory is announced soon. ''We're going to take the guns out,'
' he said.

Miami Herald correspondents Jacqueline Charles and Pablo Bachelet contributed information from Miami and Washington, respectively.

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Post by admin » Wed Feb 15, 2006 9:38 am

See no evil, hear no evil??

And Cinderella will live happily ever after...

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 9:51 am

Herald reported:[quote]Interim Prime Minister Gérard Latortue, U.S. Chief of Mission Tim Carney and the head of the U.N. peacekeeping mission, Juan Gabriel Valdes, hoped to convince Préval to urge his supporters to calm down and await a final tally. [/quote]
[quote]But Préval nixed the suggestion, saying he was not the one who riled up his supporters and he won't be making any statements until Haitian electoral officials got the numbers right. Unless a Préval victory is announced soon. ''We're going to take the guns out,' said a supporter[/quote]
Preval's leadership is being tested, and we “hope” that he could realize that!
We don't want to see him starts his presidency on the wrong foot.

http://www.rockmasters.com/news/post_el ... ctures.htm

Herald reported:[quote]Manigat said he would reject any backroom deal, however. ''Our position is very clear, whoever gets 50 percent plus one wins, and if they don't get it, we go to a second round,'' [/quote]
Manigat could save the day if his camp throw the towel, but it seems that they will stay in his corner until the final round of fight at the expense of the Haitian people.

Could 1987 be repeated…again?

Michel

T-dodo

Post by T-dodo » Wed Feb 15, 2006 11:11 am

[quote]Latortue went on the radio later in the aternoon as the mood started to settle somewhat, urging calm and saying, ``I guarantee there is no cheating going on. The will of the people will be shown with the results.'' [/quote]

De-facto Prime Minister Latortue has such a credibility gap that only one side can be seen. The other side of the gap - where it ends - is infinite. Latortue is just words no deeds. His guarantee is as good as that of Saddam's Hussein Information Minister guaranteeing victory gainst the mighty army of the United States, when impending war with the USA was looming. Even the review of the vote count, that I guess he was forced to accept, worries me. For, the audit of the vote counts will be between two versus one, with Preval rep against those of the CEP and Latortue's, which so far seem to be both the same. But Preval has proved before that he can maneouver even in a minefield. Let's ho
pe he can conjure all his political acumen again to avoid one more.

Jean-Marie

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 12:26 pm

Jean Marie, Manigat could save this turmoil if his camp call it quick and not to go to a 2nd round!!
He only have 11.% !!
It's not the time to play hardball!!

His position as a runner up for someone who want to go to a 2nd round is not even closed!!

The people are exhausted and they don't want to go to a 2nd round!!
They want to go over this masquerade, and move on!!
One thing that puzzle me is that Preval is starting a dangerous game by playing the people power card.
This is not the time!!
Tell those people to stop rioting and to go home!
The negotiations should take place in the negotiation room, and not in the street!!

His leadership is being tested, and we are concerned about him being able to maintain control of the situation at such an early stage.
Otherwise, he is sending the wrong signal that he is not ready to take
presidency, and leaving himself wide open for criticism.

One will come back later and tell us that: Well this whole situation is created by the right and the international community to steal the elections from the people not to give it to the supposedly runner up [Manigat] but as an excuse to stepping with the protectorate process.

Well daaa!!


Let' hope that Preval will be able to maintain control soon.

Gelin_

Post by Gelin_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 12:50 pm

[quote]One thing that puzzle me is that Preval is starting a dangerous game by playing the people power card. This is not the time!![/quote]
Epatati epatata....

The man has not even been sworn in yet that the blame game has already started. All is being done done to keep him from receiving what seems to be a balewouze...

One would think that after the ugly campaign that led to 02-29-04 the strategy would change. But no....keep punching...

Nobody should tell Preval what to do. He presented himself as a candidate, played by the rules, and apparently won. That should be the end of it. The crooked finger should point to those who want to play "the ravèt game" at any cost [si nou paka manje manje a, nap gade l ak sant kò nou!!!]

gelin

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Post by admin » Wed Feb 15, 2006 1:00 pm

When I suggested that Charles Baker should pull out of the reace, Michel responded with this statement, among others:

[quote]By staying through the end, he is preparing himself for the next presidential, 2011. The man is a fighter, and not a quitter! [/quote]

But now, Michel is playing an entirely different tune when it comes to Manigat:

[quote]Manigat could save this turmoil if his camp call it quick and not to go to a 2nd round!!
He only have 11.% !!
It's not the time to play hardball!!

His position as a runner up for someone who want to go to a 2nd round is not even close[d]!! [/quote]

Alò sa ki bon pou chasè li pa bon pou jibye!

Michel, you spin so quick that my head would hurt if ... !

No wonder you claimed on this forum that Charles Baker had a double-digit score in these elections!!

[Which is the big
ger double-digit by the way: 07% or 11%? Sorry, the new math is so tricky.]

And if Manigat drops out, who would come in second place in the manufactured second tour elections, that is taking a long time to bake, even though it is still in the oven?

Only a manufactured double-digit candidate would stand at the staring gate of the manufactured double-digit "blanc vote" second tour...

Ready to overtake the leading horse as soon as they break its knees at the turn.

The power of the "blanc vote" (no pun intended) !

By the way, Michel, I do not care about Charles Baker's skin color. I only questioned his love for the Haitian people. He played a HUGE role in the coup d'état of 2004. Should he become the main beneficiary of the disenfranchisement of the Haitian voter?

Once again, what you have written on this forum about Leslie Manigat and about Charles Baker is so blatantly contradictory that it makes perfect sense... to
those who can read the tea leaves.

Gelin_

Post by Gelin_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 5:32 pm

[quote]...By the way, Michel, I do not care about Charles Baker's skin color...[/quote]
And who does...?

Following that reasoning, let's try to speculate on the obvious fate of the other candidates:

Manigat was not selected because of.......let's see....maybe the size of his belly?

Serge Gilles was forgotten because of......Mmmmm!....the way he smiles?

How about Evans Paul? Maybe it's because of his nickname...

As if the haitain people cannot choose for themselves in the context of a free election. I remember the words of Chavannes Jeune once again.

gelin

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 6:39 pm

Gelin wrote: [quote]As if the Haitian people cannot choose for themselves in the context of a free election.[/quote]
Gelin my friend, the people can vote but can not proclaim the results at the same time.
Nan ki peyi sivilize ou tande sa!!
They can not be judge and jury.
They juste have to wait for the official results.
Fraud is in the air, but that should not be their concerns.
They already had spoken!!
The world heard them loudly.

Nou konanse byen fok nou fini byen.
Nou pa bezwen ap pedi tan rele bare vole!!
Kite mesye CEP yo e organizasyon internasyonal yo regle zafe vole sa.
Wont nan se sou yo ke li ye!!

Guy, for the sake of the country, I believe that the best thing to do is for all the losing candidates (Baker, Bazin, Evans Paul etc..) to call for a press conference, and [b:0b435e2f
2e]publicly express their support to Preval and to admit his victory.

If it is done, Manigat will have no choice but to give up the second round.

Manigat konnin tre byen ke distans ki genyen ant Preval e li memm tro gran, e li pat jam jwen ase sipo de lot pedan yo pou'l sa frape konn li ak Preval.

Mesye konn sa tre byen, min se roklo e soufri ke lap fe pep la soufri!! Misye ap domi reve 1987!! min pa gen Namphy la nan 2006.Bagay yo chanje!!

This old generation of Haitian politicians like Manigat so much (I don't know why) that when this guy will die, they will probably "taxidermize" his body, and make a shrine on his honor and worship him.

Michel

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Post by Jonas » Wed Feb 15, 2006 6:42 pm

PREVAL has been doing fine so far.

I don't know if those decisions are his,or they are collegiate; boy, he is running rings around the "technocrats" and their allies.

The MAN is showing himself as a cagey, smart and very sharp politician!

Gelin_

Post by Gelin_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 6:44 pm

[quote]Gelin my friend, the people can not vote and proclaim the results at the same time...[/quote]
Ok...
[quote]...They juste have to wait for the official results.[/quote]
Wrong!

[quote]Nou konanse byen fok nou fini byen.[/quote]
Pwovokasyon....

gelin

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 15, 2006 10:26 pm

Nou konanse byen fok nou fini byen. Se pa yon provokasyon ke li ye Gelin !!
Se ou chalanj, se ou commitment, promes ke pep la fe tet pa li !!
Premye bagay li di fok la le nan eleksyon. L' ale !
Dezyem bagay li di se chwazi ou lide ki aproprye a fiti pep.
Li fe'l li chwazi Preval.
Travay pep la fini la memm…. Pou le moman
Travay lide yo komanse kounyen la !!
Se al chita e negosye pou aveni peyi a.

Pa mande pep la anko pou'l al pran lari pou intimide moun, pou fe pressure pou demand yo sa akorde.
Pa itilize pep la komm che a kanon. Pa al voye yo al mouri mal.

Gade foto sa yo, gade konnpotman pep la anko.
Nou te konpran ke bagay sa yo te fini.
Mesye yo rete, yo anvayi ou propryete prive, hotel montana.
Se imaj sa yoki fe ke touris etranje kou Ayisyen ap pe vinn nan peyi a, avyon pap ateri e vole anko. E pap gen inv
estisman e travay anko.

Komanse byen, fok nou fini byen se pa ou provokasyon ni ou exsitasyon. Ni dige, ni satiyetaj, ni pase lod, ni ou avetisman, ni yon lonje dwet nan figi pep la.
Se ou chalanj ki pou montre le mond antye ke nou chanje, nou pa nan vyolans anko.
http://www.rockmasters.com/news/post_el ... ctures.htm

Komanse byen, fok nou fini byen me zanmi!!

Michel

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Post by Liline » Thu Feb 16, 2006 2:38 am

Michelnau there are a couple of things I can't agree with you on.

First of all, I think Preval played the exact right card on this one. To put another way, he was very diplomatic. He refused to ask the people to stop protesting, yes it benefits him more if they don't stop, but the fact remains, the PEOPLE have a RIGHT to protest...Ki dwa moun entènasyonal sa yo, ki dwa KEP, ki dwa nenpot nan nou la, pou nou di moun yo, yo pa gen DWA pwoteste yon bagay ke yo twouve enjis?...what right do we have to tell them they shouldn't protest? It's ironic that some people when it benefits them they want the Haitian people to take to the streets, but when it doesn't benefit them...Helas.

So yes it's unfortunate that they stormed Montana. Preval in my opinion played the right card by saying that he cannot/won't ask them to stop protesting, but he does ask that they do so without violence or distruction.


I think there's another reason why it's best if the people do protest, which leads me to another comment made by Michel that I can't agree with.

Michel wrote: [quote]Gelin my friend, the people can vote but can not proclaim the results at the same time.
Nan ki peyi sivilize ou tande sa!!
They can not be judge and jury.
They juste have to wait for the official results.[/quote]

Ok I agree with you...

[quote]Fraud is in the air, but that should not be their concerns.
They already had spoken!!
The world heard them loudly.

Nou konanse byen fok nou fini byen.
Nou pa bezwen ap pedi tan rele bare vole!!

[/quote]

Non non non, negatif.

So people should just stand aside and look as these people try to play them for the fools? Se lè sa pou nou ta rele pèp nou a sòt vre. They need to stand up for their rig
hts, their rights for their votes to be counted...fòk yo fè bwi menm, paske li ta twò fasil pou moun cheche pase sou yo an fè sanblan yo pa tande yo pa wè pèp la k'ap rele abi.

Voting is the first step yes. The second step would normally be to let the people in charge of tallying the votes to give us the results. I did say normally...So what happens when these people put "in charge" show signs of either being incompetent or up to fraud?

The Haitian people shouldn't let anybody walk all over them as if they are too stupid to realize. Answers are needed, you can't do something so obvious as play with the numbers and not expect to give answers. The Haitian people need to demand answers, and if there is fraud involved, then it needs to be delt with.


Let them "handle" it and not ask for any explanations?

Nan ki peyi sivilize,ki peyi demokratik ou tande koze konsa?

Michel ou di, "konmanse byen, fini byen", m dakò avèk ou, men olye pou s
e pèp lan w'ap di sa, m pito di moun KEP ak zòt sa pito. Paske m panse se yo ki pat deside kite sa fini byen, si se pat pou yo, sa t'ap deja fini byen.

Leonel JB

Post by Leonel JB » Thu Feb 16, 2006 4:01 am

Amen, Liline.

We can process with a Democratically elected President for 5 years, I suppose. We need a real Reconciliation!

I am willing to forgive some 184 members and Panzouyis. But, not Forget...

An nou fE chEnn linyon ki sipoze fEt la.

By the way, People who are coming from the COLD NORTH. It is WARM in Miami!!!

Map tann fanmi yo (Ann Pale'ers)

L'union fait la force,

leonel

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Post by admin » Thu Feb 16, 2006 4:34 am

Liline, mwen se moun ki pale anpil, men fwa sa mwen pito di:

AMEN! YOU SAID IT ALL, EXACTLY WHAT NEEDED TO BE SAID.

Thanks for doing it so eloquently.

Guy

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Thu Feb 16, 2006 12:18 pm

Liline ekri : [quote]Michel ou di, "konmanse byen, fini byen", m dakò avèk ou, men olye pou se pèp lan w'ap di sa, m pito di moun KEP ak zòt sa pito.[/quote]
Sorry Liline for not including the “Zot” KEP, MINUSTAH, Interim Government, political parties etc.. in my comments. It was just an oversight on my part, it was not intentional, and I apologize.

You are right they did not Konmanse Byen therefore the outcome was predictable they did not fini byen.
Garbage IN therefore garbage OUT.
Now they are under the spotlight!! And they have to deal with it.
The world and the bookies are demanding an explaination.
Unfortunately, they can not ask for their money back. This is a no refund policy.
Sansib pa jwe!!Pep la chwazi/mize e li genyen!!. See you in 5 years!!
Nou konnin ke
pwochin fwa, wap tounin tou limin, min nap la tou!! Bring them on!!
Liline wrote: [quote]Answers are needed; you can't do something so obvious as play with the numbers and not expect to give answers. The Haitian people need to demand answers, and if there is fraud involved, then it needs to be delt with.[/quote]
Liline, ma chere, bolette la finn tire, pep la genyen, lajan'l e presidan nan poch li, kidonk li pa bezwen chache zo nan kalalou, ni lonje dwet sou moun, ni avili moun. Malin malin edemi, kite yo regle zafe yo.

Nou finn lonje dwet sou koulev la deja, kidonk kite yo touyel yo mem, pou yo pa di se nou mem ki fel.
Nou pakab temouyn, jij e exzekite alafwa.

What the people are demanding are:

Identify the perpetrators.

What was the motive behind those violations?

Who benefits or got pay off financially, and politically?

If those perpetrators local or and international are found guilty, of those illegal a
ctivities to defraud and disenfranchise a poor people like Haitians of their human right, and constitutional rights as a nation to go peacefully and vote for their leaders, the people are demanding that those individuals be identified publicly and be punished accordingly.

In addition, the people could demand that a commission be formed to analyze future electoral frauds and how to avoid them in the future.

Pep la konanse byen, kitel fini byen!!
Liline wrote:[quote] It's ironic that some people when it benefits them they want the Haitian people to take to the streets, but when it doesn't benefit them...Helas. [/quote]
This is politics at its best Liline!! By imposing a socialist economic model that increases the dependence of the poor on government entitlements, the poor will always be a gold mine for the crooked politicians and activists left or right to cash in.
They are using the mass lik
e pit bulls, and when they want to intimidate their opponents, they just let them loose!!

Li le pou bagay sa yo fini!!

Liline, e nou tout ki sou fowom Ann Pale, fok nou pa agi an « pitbulls e al kole dan sou moun ».
Job nou se watchdogs. Sa vle di fok nou jape e jape byen fo pou nou sa reveye pep la e tout voazinaj nan zonn nan e le mond antye pou yo vinn konstate konn temouyin jan moun malveyan sa yo soti pou fe magouy sou nou.
Le evidans la kle, le sa nap kap mande jistis e dedomajman.

Men le nou rele bare volo e nou fe jistis nou memm (koupe tet, boule kay), nou detouyi evidans yo, yap jwen tout exkiz pou yo pa bay nou dedomajman.
Sam di la se ou egsanp ke mwen pran, se pa opinyon pa mwen :wink: .

An nou kenbe la!!

Michel

T-dodo

Post by T-dodo » Fri Feb 17, 2006 3:02 pm

[quote]Gade foto sa yo, gade konnpotman pep la anko. Nou te konpran ke bagay sa yo te fini. Mesye yo rete, yo anvayi ou propryete prive, hotel montana. Se imaj sa yoki fe ke touris etranje kou Ayisyen ap pe vinn nan peyi a, avyon pap ateri e vole anko. E pap gen investisman e travay anko.[/quote]

Michel,

This is an example where we, Haitians, continue to show, not only little immagination, but also an inability to learn the lessons of history. That the people would take the streets, if they feel they were being cheated by a KEP who had lost all credibility, was foreseeable. And if they take the streets, it was also foreseeable that their actions could degenerate into losses of lives and destruction of property. Based on that knowledge, the leaders' responsibility should have been to try not to give the people a reason to take the streets, like giving them the impression that their votes are being
stolen. Instead, like you suggested, the leaders assumed that the people changed. Thus, the people would not react when felt that they are being cheated. When will our leaders learn to deal with reality instead of wishful thinking?

Jean-Marie

Gelin_

Post by Gelin_ » Fri Feb 17, 2006 3:58 pm

M te bay yon sèl grenn mo kòm repons sou kesyon sa a: pwovokasyon.

Nan lane 2001 nan vil nouyòk ponpyè ak lapolis te pete goumen. Yo te oblije arete detwa ladan yo. Lè te gen lòbèy nan peyi kanada, kanadyen yo te goumen yon ak lòt e yo te kraze brize tèt kale. Poukisa m ap di sa a? Se paske m konnen ke detwa malveyan pral kouri bri ke se paske ayisyen pa sivilize ki fè yo aji konsa. Repons la se menm mo a: pwovokasyon.

Tout bèt jennen mwòde, ke l te gen kravat oubyen l te pye atè. O o, m manke bliye. Se pa konsa mesye edike gnb yo te aji kèk mwa de sa....?

gelin

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Fri Feb 17, 2006 11:02 pm

Jean Marie you said it so eloquently that you did not leave any room for me to do a follow up.
But nevertheless, those pictures are valued more than a thousand words.

Those pictures represent a nightmare for a Diaspora family who would like one day come back home.

Those pictures represent a nightmare for Haitian entrepreneurs or foreign businessmen who would like one day invest in the country.

Those pictures put Haiti in “high risk” category for insurance, and security companies.

Those pictures represent lack of leadership and inability to control the people, and to bring them back to a civilized behavior.

Those pictures represent wrongful entry, and invasion of private property.

Gelin said that the people have the right to protest, and they did it out of frustration when they learned that they were being cheated from their votes.
YES I agree with you that the people have the RIGHT t
o protest.
But look closely at those pictures again. This is not a peaceful protest. This is a riot, destruction and invasion of private properties, and intimidation
My favorite pictures are the swimming pool scenes and supporters of Rene Preval relax in a pool lounge bed after storming into the upscale Hotel Montana.
Ala kote mesye sa yo a lez papa!!

Warning!! Those pictures are not post cards!

http://www.rockmasters.com/news/post_el ... ctures.htm

Michel

Gelin_

Post by Gelin_ » Sat Feb 18, 2006 11:11 am

[quote]...Those pictures represent lack of leadership and inability to control the people, and to bring them back to a <u>civilized behavior</u>.[/quote]
I went ahead and used the word 'sivilize' for you just before you put it, because I knew very well that's where you were headed. Please go back a few months, and apply the same treatement to the GNBists - if you can, that is.

[quote]Those pictures represent wrongful entry, and invasion of private property.[/quote]
Yes - but they are not uncivilized for that. It was just an angry crowd.

[quote]Warning!! Those pictures are not post cards![/quote]
Some can use them that way, and that would be ok, too. Why? Because the GNB ones are available also and guess who is on them.....Oooops!!!

gelin

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Sun Feb 19, 2006 3:59 pm

Gelin wrote:[quote]Yes - but they are not uncivilized for that. It was just an angry crowd.[/quote]Burning cars, breaking store windows, rioting and invasion of private properties are not actions of just an angry crowd!!
This is behaving on an uncivilized manner!! Those things are being repeated too often!! It's like a second nature.
Regardless if it's from GNBists or Chimeres. It does not represent the images of the Haitian people.

Good governance requires that leaders to have control over its people, and be able to take preemptive measures to defuse their actions that could damage the image of the government.

Michel

Gelin_

Post by Gelin_ » Tue Feb 21, 2006 3:44 pm

[quote]Gelin wrote:[quote]Yes - but they are not uncivilized for that. It was just an angry crowd.[/quote]Burning cars, breaking store windows, rioting and invasion of private properties are not actions of just an angry crowd!![/quote]
Had this happened elsewhere, you would have surely found other words to describe it. I repeat: The people showed their maturity on election day and after. Things got out of control (sort of) after they kept hearing meow-meow instead of the official results of their vote.

[quote]Regardless if it's from GNBists or Chimeres...[/quote]
Really? How did you chatacterize similar events in 2003 when they were orchestrated by G184 and others....?

gelin

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Guysanto
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Jacques Bernard abandonne le Conseil Electoral

Post by Guysanto » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:36 am

Haiti-Elections-Démission
Jacques Bernard abandonne le Conseil Electoral

Le départ du directeur général, provoqué par le rôle de "figurant" que lui attribuaient les nouveaux règlements généraux, ouvre une nouvelle crise au CEP chargé d'organiser prochainement les élections sénatoriales et indirectes

vendredi 25 janvier 2008,

Radio Kiskeya

Après plusieurs semaines de folles rumeurs sur son départ, le directeur général du Conseil Electoral Provisoire, Jacques Bernard, a finalement jeté l'éponge en déplorant la révision des règlements internes de l'institution qui fait de lui un "simple exécutant".

Dans une interview à Radio Kiskeya, M. Bernard a confirmé avoir notifié jeudi par lettre le Président de la république, René Préval et celui du CEP, Frantz-Gérard Verret de sa "décision irrévocable". Estimant que son "pouvoir de décision était réduit à sa plus simple expression", l'intéressé a indiqué avoir manifesté à plusieurs reprises son profond désaccord avec les nouveaux règlements généraux qui l'empêchent même de procéder à des nominations dans l'appareil électoral.

Jacques Bernard, qui précise que son retrait est motivé par des raisons purement professionnelles et non personnelles, soutient que n'importe quel autre fonctionnaire de son rang aurait pris à sa place la même décision.

Pour lui, la nouvelle conception de la direction générale, à l'opposé de celle ayant permis l'organisation avec succès des élections de 2006, est nettement incompatible avec les attributions fondamentales de la fonction dans l'organisation du processus électoral.

Le directeur général démissionnaire révèle également avoir été confronté dès le départ à l'hostilité de certains conseillers électoraux. Ce qui rendait la collaboration extrêmement difficile.

Jacques Bernard entend désormais partager son temps entre Port-au-Prince et Washington comme c'était le cas avant sa nomination en 2005 à la direction générale du Conseil Electoral Provisoire présidé alors par Max Mathurin.

Le départ précipité de celui dont l'expertise en matière électorale est unanimement reconnue ouvre une crise au nouveau CEP mis en place depuis seulement deux mois et plonge dans l'incertitude totale le processus de renouvellement de 11 des 30 sièges au Sénat de la république.

spp/Radio Kiskeya

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