Why Obama?

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Caroline_

Why Obama?

Post by Caroline_ » Sat Jul 26, 2008 1:16 pm

I haven't been to the forum for quite a while and decided to come over when I received the email from Guy - thanks Guy!

Well, I don't really have to say what the first thing I noticed was when I pulled up windows on Haiti - hard to miss the huge Obama campaign pix and fund-raisers.

To tell the truth I almost clicked the little x because it struck me as so biased. But then, its Guy's website and he can put whatever he wants to on it. I used to support Obama as well, until I realized that I didn't know WHY I supported him other than the promises he was making (and how beautifully he was delivering them).

My question is this: For the Obama supporters - why are you supporting him? Are there any accomplishments he's made that caused you to believe in him? Please tell me, other than the fact that he's a brilliant orator, what solid qualifications does he have, and what are the reasons that you are supporting him?

I will admit that I believe there are many people voting for him simply because he's a Black man. Now, before you start throwing things at me, please know that I think being a Black man automatically qualifies you for a lot of things - I wouldn't even look twice at a man unless he was Black. LOL Truth!!! But I wonder how many Obama supporters are like I was and don't really have any solid reason for supporting him other than his promises are so inspiring and he's really pleasant to look at! :)

Thanks!
caroline

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Guysanto
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Post by Guysanto » Sat Jul 26, 2008 4:01 pm

That's a very pertinent question, Caroline! Thanks for coming back to the forum and for not clicking "the little x" instead. I really appreciate it.

I have editorialized my comments in this link:

http://annpale.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=21682,

taking out some previously written comments of a personal nature. The subject matter deserves my full seriousness.

Peace,
Guy

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Post by Serge » Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:33 am

Caroline, I was busy trying to comment on your message last night when I accidentally erased everything. What frustration! I am going to try again, as briefly as possible.

Guy has already raised some very valid points , so I will not dwell too much. I will just say that those who are dreaming of an Obama as someone who is going to tackle some of those hard issues in a revolutionary manner are not being realistic.

For example the FISA vote was unfortunate. But, the democrats have always been accused of being weak on national security. So, Obama the politician played it safe, even as McCain and his supporters were accusing them of flip-flopping. This is establishment politics. This is a presidential contest we are dealing with.

If you take the Cuba position, again one has to understand that the Cuba lobbying has managed to become quite powerful in American politicis. Obama needs the Latino vote in Florida. So he plays it safe, pledging to lift travel restrictions, but to maintain the "stupid" embargo, as Guy says. By doing so, he satifies the Cubans who want to be able to travel to Cuba and those who want to maintain the embargo. Do not think logic here. The US' foreign policy is full of contradictions and we have to realize that and view Obama in this context.

It would be too long to go into each issue here, but suffice it to say as Guy, that on balance, despite his so-called "lack of experience", Obama is far better that MCCain on many issues.

1) The Iraq War. Obama advocates an end to the war and withdrawal of the troops in 16 months. The Iraquis themselves agree. Obama says rightly that those billions pouring into Iraq can be invested instead in the American economy to remedy many problems.

2) McCain stupidly enough accuses Obama of being responsible for the high cost of oil and credits Bush for the cost drop of the barrel of oil! Just incredible! Under Nixon, the US were importing 28% of its oil; in 2008, this percentage is about 78%. Where was Obama at that time? I will let you do the math and reach the conclusion.

I believe Obama has a much more sound approach of the ways to solve problems in this country. I would have one word of caution though. In general, I believe that it is on the domestic front tht Obama has a chance to really affect the situation in this country. On matter of foreign policy though, I have less illusion that an Obama administration would create a revolution. The Jewish lobby is way too powerful. The Cuban Lobby is way too powerful. So I do not believe we should think ahead of ourselves, but rather be realistic that the US Establishment remains all powerful.

After 8 years of the Republican administration, people are ready for a change. We are not talking in the abstract, the facts are there for everyone to see: a mismanaged economy, a foolish war and a tendency to open a new front (something will surely happen during a McCain administration); an administration which engaged in torture (and refuses to recognize the International Criminal Court for fear its citizens might be brought before that Court) ; a total disregard for the suffering people in this country (Katrina, Bush being forced to sign the Housing Bill which he had ferociously opposed in the past while the rate of foreclosures dramatically increased) and on and on.

Obama represents that change and even though one may not agree on everything, I repeat, like Guy, that on balance, there is no comparison: Obama would be much better.

The question to be asked now is the following: why is it that, in the face of all this, Obama should only be ahead of McCain by only 6 or 7 points?

From my own perspective, this can only be atttributed to the question of race. A big chunk of the American people is not yet ready to admit that a black man can be that intelligent, that articulate and that well-versed so as to reach the presidency. Never mind the issue of experience. John Kennedy did not have that much experience either. Some news anchors are barely beginning to address the issue, albeit carefully, cautiously. Guy mentioned Obama's speech on race as a key turning point. I totally agree, but despite that, too many are still afraid or just plain scared. Remember how none other than Geraldine Ferraro was suggesting that white people cannot talk anymore! Pardon me! Did I hear well?

The real test for this country will be when, on the date of the general election, the white voter goes into the booth, alone with himself, and he deposits his ballot in the box. Will he have the guts to vote for the better candidate, or will he believe that a black man will be dangerous for the country if he becomes president ? Will he believe that he cannot vote for a Muslim? Will he be able to clear his mind and vote on the basis of the facts?

The jury will be out in 180 days on all these questions. But I remain convinced that is the only issue that keeps Obama down in the poll.
I cannot vote in this country, but frankly, if I could, I would vote for a toad rather than vote for McCain.

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And history is made....

Post by Serge » Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:20 pm

There is a proverb in Haitian Kreyòl that goes like this: rayi chen, di dan l blanch.

In other words, say what you will about the United States and its horrendous foreign policy which caused such hardships around the world, particularly for small defenseless countries; but if you looked at the Democratic Convention tonight, history was made when for the first time , an African American was nominated by a major political party to be its candidate to nothing less than the presidency of the United States.

Indeed, when you think that barely 60 years ago, part of this country was reknown for its hard core racism, blacks were beingg lynched, discrimination was rampant; when you think that after all this, an African American could become president of this country, one should pause and take stock of the enormous amount of progress made, as this occurs, coincidentally, on the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous "I have a dream" speech. One can only imagine how such leaders as Congressman John Lewis, Jesse Jackson, Jim Clyburn and so on, must feel, as they think of the Dream Martin Luther King was talking about.

There is still discrimination, now doubt, but Obama's nomination is historic, not only for the democratic party, but for the country as a whole and the United States can proudly say to the world that tremendous progress has been achieved in that area, progress that few countries around the world can boast. For example, when can we expect to see a French of Arab descent become a candidate to the presidency of that country, or a black French Martiniquan or Guadeloupean? When can we expect to see an English person of Caribbean descent become prime minister of England? As fas as I know, there are a precious few in parliament, but that is all. In Latin America, it is the same situation. There are more blacks in Brazil that in the United States, but you would never know it. In Bolivia, Evo Morales is the first full-blooded Indian to have become president.

Win or lose, Barack Obama and the Democratic party have already opened doors, the same way that those before Obama had opened doors for him. Rayi chen , di dan l blanch. Indeed, what happened this afternoon was quite an achievement for the United States, for American society, for tthe Democratic Party which paved the way for something like that to happen.

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Post by Guysanto » Thu Oct 09, 2008 10:09 pm

It appears that we'll never know whether Caroline was satisfied with my answer or our answers.

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